Hello,

The Oregon South Coast Regional Tourism Network is hiring a Regional Coordinator.

Apply now for the position of Network Manager of the Oregon South Coast Regional Tourism Network

The Oregon South Coast Tourism Network is looking for a smart, spirited, and capable Network Manager. Click here to learn more about the network and see below for a detailed job description for the Network Manager.

A Network Manager’s primary job is to help build a cohesive, resilient network that supports the mission of the Oregon South Coast Tourism Network as outlined in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The role of a Network Manager is not to run an organization. Instead, the role is designed to help the network convene, connect, communicate, coordinate, and collaborate around its shared purpose. A primary goal is to continually cultivate trust amongst its members.

Apply Now
To apply, send a resume and cover letter in PDF format to Southcoastnetworkmanager@gmail.com by February 23rd at midnight PT. The subject line of your email should read “Application for Network Manager position”. We will then follow up by March 16th with information about the first round of interviews. Your cover letter should respond to these three questions:

Applications are now being accepted until February 23rd, 2018
CLICK HERE FOR DESCRIPTION and APPLICATION INFORMATION

 

January 25th, 2018

Agritourism Conference Built for Your Future Success

Join us for a great day of networking and info!
Join us for a great day of networking and info!

By Mary Stewart, OSU Extension Service

Hello and welcome to the new year!

If you’re like us, you have some lofty goals cleverly disguised as New Year’s resolutions. If any of those goals include furthering your agritourism operation, gaining inspiration, building your agritourism network, or getting to the bottom of some nagging questions, we’ve got an event tailored just for you.

You are enthusiastically invited to the 2018 Agritourism Conference for Clackamas, Marion, and Polk Counties.

The Agritourism Conference is an educational and networking event for farm direct marketers and other agritourism operators, designed for all sizes and types of farms, ranches, woodlands, nurseries, wineries, food processors and botanical gardens. It is also a great place to meet other operators, share your knowledge and learn better business strategy.

We will be addressing such topics as:

  • Forming a diverse marketing portfolio to best represent your business
  • Adding outdoor recreation tourism to your business mix
  • Models of success from here & elsewhere
  • How zoning and health regulations affect agritourism operations
  • Willamette Valley wine trends
  • Lessons learned from the total eclipse
  • Web design and increasing SEO

We hope you can join us for this year’s conference. The details are as follows:

WHEN: Wednesday, January 24, 2018, 8:30am-3:00pm

WHERE: The Oregon Garden, Orchid Room, 895 W. Main Street, Silverton

COST: $20 per person, includes lunch

REGISTRATION: Here!

The event is co-sponsored by: OSU Extension Service, Clackamas County Tourism & Cultural Affairs, Kyle Bunch Agency – American Family Insurance, and Oregon Farm Loop.

If you have any questions about the event, please contact Mary or Victoria at 503-588-5301.

Looking forward to seeing you at the conference!

Oregon’s forests are among the most diverse and productive ecosystems in the world, ranging from dry juniper and pine forests on the east side of the Cascades to lush old-growth Douglas fir forests on the west side. The fog belt region, also called the Coast Ecological Province, which is the smallest and narrowest forested region in the state, stretches north to south across the entire state along the coast.

Shore Pine. Source.

What differentiates the fog belt zone from the rest of the forested zones in Oregon is the summer climate. While the rest of the state experiences high  temperatures and little moisture, the fog belt experiences lower temperatures and increased moisture and humidity. Topographically, the fog belt sits at relatively low elevation, rising up from sea level to four or five hundred feet.

This climatically and topographically unique region supports highly diverse fauna and flora, and some common trees one will see when visiting the fog belt include Shorepine, Sitka Spruce, Western Cedar, and Douglas Fir.

Shorepine (Pinus contorta) is the only species of pine that grows in the fog belt.

They grow within a few miles of the coast and are typically bushy and distorted. The species has specially adapted to grow in rocky sites and sandy soil, such as sand dunes, and surviving powerful salty winds. These trees bare their round, twisted needles in clusters of twos.

Sitka Spruce. Source. 

Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis) trees were once called the tideland spruce because they like the cool, foggy environment of the coast.

This species is the largest species of spruce, growing to almost 100 meters tall, and the largest Sitka tree in Oregon is found in Clatsop County with a diameter of more than 5 meters. These trees bare flat needles and thin, light grey bark that easily peels off. The trunk of the Sitka Spruce is buttressed and does not go straight into the ground like lodgepole pines. Sitka Spruce is named after Sitka Island, now called Baranof Island, off the coast of Alaska. Sitka Spruce is Alaska’s state tree.

Western Redcedar (Thuja plicata) trees are the only “cedars” with cones turned up and bent backwards on the branch (this species is not a true cedar species).

Western Redcedar. Source.

Another method of identifying Western Red Cedar trees is by looking at the underside of the foliage, where you will see a tiny shape outlined in white; some say this shape looks like a bowtie or a butterfly.

Western redcedar’s frondlike branches are so dense that some Northwest Native Americans called this tree “shabalup,” which means “dry underneath,” because the branches look like they could shed rain. These trees were the main trees used by the Northwest Native Americans to make canoes.

Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) is Oregon’s most common tree and the state tree.

Douglas fir. Source.

The coast variety of this tree grows in the fog belt. The cone of a Douglas fir is very easily identifiable. Only cones from this tree have three-pointed bracts sticking out between the cone scales. These are said to look like the hind feet and tail of a mouse diving into a hole. The largest Douglas fir, the Doerner Fir, is located in Coos County and stands at 327 feet tall.

There are many other trees that can be found along the fog belt, as well as many common understory plants. To learn more, pick up a copy of Oregon State University Extension Service’s field guide, Trees to Know in Oregon.