National Extension Tourism Conference: Tourism in the 21st Century

About the 2017 NET Conference
http://extensiontourism.net

This conference is an outstanding opportunity for Extension professionals and others working in the broad area of tourism and recreation – including tourism service providers and businesses – to share programs, initiatives, research, and success stories, and to network with other professionals.

This year’s theme, “Tourism in the 21st Century: Connecting Communities, Places, and People,” focuses on the important role that tourism plays in many aspects of communities, places, and people.

Topical areas include:

  1. Nature‐Based Tourism: Ecotourism, Wildlife‐watching, and Adventure Tourism
  2. Agritourism – Local Foods, Farmers Markets, Culinary Tourism, and Farm Stays
  3. Cultural-Heritage Tourism
  4. Marketing and Promotion – the Digital Revolution
  5. The Shared Economy
  6. Placemaking
  7. Community and Regional Planning and Development
  8. Economic, Environmental, and Social Impacts of Tourism and Recreation
  9. Tourism Education, Training, and Certification Programs
  10. Tourism Research and Evaluation

Call for Proposals

We invite you to submit a proposal for presentation at the conference!

Presentation Types

  • Oral Presentation (20 minute presentation with 5-10 minutes for Q&A)
  • Poster Presentation – The standard poster size is 36 x 48.
  • Workshop Presentation (60 minutes) – Workshops should not just be extended oral presentations, as these should include an interactive component providing hands-on experiential opportunities for professional development. A limited number of workshops will be accepted.

Potential presenters are encouraged to submit more than one presentation proposal, if interested.

Visit the Call for Proposals webpage to submit your proposal(s).

The deadline for submission is March 13, 2017, and presenters will be notified in mid-April if accepted.

Specific questions or inquiries regarding proposal submissions may be addressed to:
Dr. Steve Burr, 2017 NET Conference Program Chair
Email: steve.burr@usu.edu
Phone: (435) 797-5120

“Tourism in the 21st Century:
Connecting Communities, Places and People”

Nassau Inn, Princeton, NJ
August 8 – 10, 2017

Miles Phillips
Miles Phillips joins Oregon Sea Grant Extension

BANDON — Oregon Sea Grant and the Oregon State University Extension Service have hired an outdoor recreation expert from Texas to boost tourism along Oregon’s southern coast.

Now based in Bandon, Miles Phillips comes to OSU from Texas A&M University Extension, where he brought together elements of the agriculture, forestry, natural resources and adventure industries to create a cohesive and sustainable tourism program. He worked to broaden traditional tourism to encompass such diverse activities as hunting, visiting pumpkin patches, landscape painting and kayaking. He’ll use a similar approach in Oregon.

His top priority is to use Extension’s research, engagement and outreach based approach to combine the many arms of the tourism industry into one alliance to brings visitors to the southern Oregon coast, improve the economy and promote conservation of its natural resources for community well being.

“This is a great example of how Extension plays a role in the changing economy and changing demographics across the state,” said Phillips, who has been the chair of the National Extension Tourism Design Team for four years. “Outdoor recreation is a big part of the mix.”

Phillips will initially concentrate on the south coast from Reedsport to Brookings – an area especially hard hit by economic challenges – but will also offers service to the full coast. OSU Extension collaborated closely with Travel Oregon and local community partners to identify the region’s destination development needs as the new position took shape. Wild Rivers Coast Alliance, the philanthropic arm of the world-class Bandon Dunes Golf Resort in Bandon, lent its support as well.

“It was clear that there was an opportunity to address business development issues on the south coast and a focus on coastal tourism was a natural fit,” David Hanson, Sea Grant’s outreach and engagement leader. “Miles’ experience in Texas was exactly the type of programming that we are hoping to replicate.”

Phillips, whose position was funded by the Oregon State Legislature, said his immediate goal is to pinpoint the needs of individual communities and to identify and connect resources offered by Extension and other organizations to meet those needs. Strategies include a website, seminars, publications and community meetings.

“There is a lot of information out there,” he said. “It’s a matter of getting it into people’s hands and helping them figure out how to use the resources to be successful.”

Phillips will also be working to bring community college and OSU students on board as interns, a step he sees as a vital part of Extension’s mission to increase destination development and improve educational opportunities. He will collaborate with the OSU’s College of Business’s new program in hospitality management as well as the outdoor recreation leadership and tourism program in OSU’s College of Forestry.

“As Oregon’s land grant university, OSU has a long history of serving the state’s rural and urban communities,” said Scott Reed, vice provost for University Outreach and Engagement. “Our new South Coast Extension tourism and business development position is a prime example of our commitment to expand and mobilize the resources of the university to have a sustainable, positive impact on the economic vitality of the region and beyond.”

Jim Seeley, executive director of Wild Rivers Coast Alliance, said Phillips’ appointment comes at a crucial time when four tourism initiatives are underway in the area. They include a tourism work group that’s funded by WRCA and Coos County, and an upcoming rural tourism studio training program on the south coast offered by Travel Oregon.

“Miles, who has a long and distinguished career in the education area of nature-based tourism, will be part of these and other ongoing efforts to help strategize the best approach to accomplishing our objectives,” Seeley said. “That’s what makes him so significant. We’ve got these four trains heading into the station and now OSU enters the station and that’s the biggest train of all.”