Hatfield Marine Science Center. Image Source.

Newport is one of the seven major cities located on Oregon’s Central Coast. With a population of about 10,400, Newport is the largest of the seven. Newport can be found between the Pacific Ocean, the Coast Mountains, and Yaquina Bay. This unique location not only provides a ton of natural beauty but also allows for plenty of outdoor recreation activities, like fishing and kayaking.

In the past, Newport’s economy was built on the Bayfront, a port that housed the commercial fishing and timber industries. Even today, Bayfront still holds one of the largest commercial fishing fleets in Oregon. As time has progressed, tourism has begun to play a more significant role in Newport’s economy. The Bayfront is now a working waterfront with a variety of attractive shops and businesses littered along the street. Visitors can enjoy cozy cafes, eye-catching art galleries, and still-running fish processing plants. Among these numerous shops and restaurants is Local Ocean, a restaurant that focuses on locally, fresh-caught seafood. It even has a seafood market component in case you plan on cooking during your stay. Newport is also home to the famous Rogue Brewery, a massive pub located just underneath the south side of the Yaquina Bay Bridge.

Lighthouse at Yaquina Head. Image Source.

Lighthouses occur all along Oregon’s coast but Newport is home to the state’s tallest and second oldest active lighthouse. Built in 1872, the 93 foot tall structure can be found at Yaquina Head, a natural area that was formed by lava flow more than 14 million years ago. Other must see attractions in Newport would be the Oregon Coast Aquarium which has some of the animals that make Oregon’s coast so special. One could even pay a visit to OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center to get a taste on how scientific research plays into our understanding of these creatures.

By Sea Grant Interns Dustin James and Catie Michell

On July 14-16, Catie and I had the fortune of working alongside Justin Meyers of Myers Imaging Company and Erik Urdahl of Urdahl Photo as they completed their shoot of the South Coast for our Wild Rivers Photo Project. The Wild Rivers Coast Photo Project is a Travel Oregon funded project to get professional images of Oregon’s South Coast. These images will be used for tourism marketing purposes and will focus on outdoor recreation, natural scenery, in-town hotspots, and local wildlife. Justin and Erik had come down mid-June to shoot the areas of Bandon and Port Orford and on this particular weekend they were focusing their shoot on Gold Beach and Brookings. In total they will be shooting approximately 200 photos for this project.

Morning paddle-boarding at Sunset Beach

We met up with Justin, Erik, and Dave Lacey of South Coast Tours LLC at 6:45am on Friday. They started their shoot doing an early morning paddle-boarding session at Secret Beach, and the day just took off from there. Throughout the day, we visited spots like the Chetco River’s Elephant Rock, the Brookings port, and various restaurants. We concluded the day with photographs of sunset at Samuel Boardman State Park. On Saturday, Justin and Erik took photos of Catie and I paddleboarding on Hunter Creek near Gold Beach. We then went tidepooling at Harris Beach State Park, followed by some ocean fishing and eventually a few visits to breweries and other businesses. The eventful day was concluded with late afternoon paddle-boarding at Secret Beach once again. On Sunday, I joined Justin up in Port Orford as he took a few street biking photos along the Elk River.

Cliff jumping at Elephant Rock on the Chetco River

The photos will be used for free by communities along the Wild Rivers Coast to help market to visitors. The community official destination management organization (DMO) will be able to access images through a service provided by the Oregon Coast Visitor Association (OCVA) who will manage the images.

(Right to left) Justin Meyers, Erik Urdahl, and myself

To see more of Justin’s and Erik’s work, check out their websites at http://www.myersic.com/ and http://urdahlphoto.com/.

Image result for winchester bay fishing

Winchester Bay is located where the Umpqua River meets the Pacific Ocean, just north of the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area. While the timber, agriculture, and fishing industries have been a dominant contributor to the town’s economy throughout the 1900s, today, tourism is increasingly becoming more prominent. One thing in particular that is bringing in people is the great fishing opportunities. With its unique location, Winchester Bay is an ideal region for lake, river, and ocean fishing.

In the past, Winchester Bay has faced strict fishing regulations due to decreases in the salmon population. Regulations peaked in 2008 when all ocean salmon fishing was prohibited, leading to a $22 million in statewide losses to businesses that support recreational fishing with most of those losses occurring in coastal towns. In addition to this, commercial fishing businesses were projected to lose $23 million due to the closure. Fortunately for Winchester and the rest of the Oregon coast, sport salmon fishing was given the go-ahead by the Pacific Fishery management Council in early April 2017 under certain restrictions. To view a detailed account on season starting dates, areas open, and catch limits, click here.

 

From rock fish, to ling cod, to both the chinook and coho salmon, and even sturgeon, Winchester Bay is not lacking in fish species. There are a number of fishing charters that make full use of these unique fishing opportunities. Charters can be found on the Oregon Coast Visitor Association’s website. Crabbing is allowed year round in bays, estuaries, tide pools, piers, and jetties, with a license. So bring your crab pots and fishing lines over to Winchester Bay for a good time!