$3000 Prizes Open to Pros & Amateurs

CALL to PHOTOGRAPHERS – http://wildriverslandtrust.org

Dear Photographer Friends,

I wanted to invite you to participate in our first ever Wild Rivers Land Trust Photography Contest!


We are thrilled to be working with some local property owners and  some of our local photo friends like you, to create an all new program of photographing wildlife along the southern Oregon coast. There are so many possibilities for this and we are hoping you can be our charter group to pave the way!

The basics:
– go to our website – http://www.wildriverslandtrust.org/news–events.html
– read the rules and register
– we will match you with a landowner/partner so you make arrangements to set up your shooting dates sometime between Sept 26 and Oct 4th
– if you have any questions, please give me a call at 541-253-1260

Hope to hear back from you soon! Feel free to pass this along to some of your other serious photo friends. I should also mention that we have only five properties available so there will be a limit to the number of photographers for this first year.

From WRLT

Pamela, Wild Rivers Land Trust

US Department of Agriculture, Rural Development (USDA-RD) program recently launched a resource guide that supports recreational economies in rural America.

This guide provides rural community leaders and economic development practitioners a complete program list for the Rural Development program, Forest Service, and National Institute for Food and Agriculture.

Get one

Find this resource guide in a PDF format at
https://www.rd.usda.gov/sites/default/files/RD_Recreation_Economy_USDA.pdf

Pacific Madrone – (Arbutus menziesii)

While traveling in coastal Oregon watch for a tree with red bark and broad evergreen leaves. This tree is a Pacific Madrone.

Various conifer trees dominate the Coastal range but if you look you will notice the Pacific Madrone. Madrone is a broadleaved evergreen tree and a member of the heath family (Ericaceae).

It is distinguished by its smooth trunk, orange-red bar that peels when the tree is mature. The peeling bark reveals a green satiny, smooth stem.

Seed & Blossoms

Pacific madrone will grow to a height of 125 feet tall and may grow up to 4 feet in diameter. At three to five years old, it will begin to produce seed.

Trees begin flowering in early spring, from mid-March to May, depending on the elevation. The bell-shaped blossoms are dense, drooping clusters (terminal panicles) of small, white flowers.

The fruit is a berry (0.3 to 0.5 inches), that ripens in the fall, turning from yellow-green to bright red or reddish-orange. The berries were used by wildlife and humans for food, decoration, fish bait, and medicine.

The wood is used for furniture, flooring, turnings, paneling, veneer for hardwood plywood faces and core stock, pulpwood, and firewood.

Links & References

To get a PDF fact sheet about the Pacific Madrone from Oregon Department of Forestry see: https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Documents/ForestBenefits/PacificMadrone.pdf

Sacred Trees

For some more cultural/spiritual thoughts about the Madrone see http://www.arbutusarts.com/sacred-trees.html

“On the British Columbia West Coast, the Salish Nation also honors the Arbutus Tree as their ‘Tree of Knowledge’ because it knows how to find the sun. It twists and turns and somehow knows to drop one branch when there is not enough sunlight and it is shaded and it will grow a new one where the sun can reach it.”